Morrisons to sell ‘cheapest avocado on the market’

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Nina Pullman

BY NINA PULLMAN

@nina_pullman

Morrisons to sell ‘cheapest avocado on the market’

Retailer has launched new wonky avocado line with South African fruit selling for £2.40 per kg despite global supply tightening

Morrisons to sell ‘cheapest avocado on the market’

Morrisons has added avocados to its wonky range

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Morrisons is to sell a 650g net of ‘wonky’ South African avocados for £1.56 claiming that it now sells the “cheapest avocado on the British market”.

The promotion means Morrisons will sell avocados for £2.40 per kg, or 39p each, compared to the average retail price of £1.05.

In comparison, Morrisons said Aldi has a size 24 avocado with an average weight of 163g for 45p each under the ‘Super Six’ promotion this week, which it said works out as £2.54 per kg for a class A product.

Each Morrisons net will contain four fruit on average, the retailer said, and include the Hass, Pinkerton and Fuerte varieties. Natural wind scarring has led to assorted sizes and superficial skin blemishes of avocados in the wonky range. The offer will run from 15 May until the end of the summer.

It comes as suppliers and producers struggle to keep pace with soaring global demand, with reports of shortages this week due to production issues in Peru, California and Mexico. Global prices of avocados have recently reached record levels due to a tight supply.

Morrisons avocado buyer James Turner said: “Avocados have become one of Britain’s most expensive salad items. But our new wonky line means customers will be able to buy this luxury item for a fraction of the price.

“Apart from being odd shapes and sizes, and with some marks on the outer hard skin, they’re the same as normal avocados. They taste great and have the same levels of healthy nutritional ingredients.”

Morrisons said the introduction of the wonky line will have a number of benefits for South African avocado growers, helping to reduce waste, increasing yields and selling whole crops.

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