For fresh produce marketing in Australia and New Zealand
Matthew Jones

BY MATTHEW JONES

@matt_fruitnet

Breakfast could boost consumption

Research identifies new opportunity to convince more New Zealanders to eat fruit and vegetables

Breakfast could boost consumption

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A New Zealand survey has identified breakfast as a driver for growing the country’s fresh produce consumption.

The online survey, coordinated by charitable trust 5+ A Day, found that 39 per cent of New Zealanders are unlikely to eat fresh produce at breakfast. The same response for other meal and snacking occasions ranged from 17-25 per cent.

“Breakfast is an ideal time to eat healthy foods and kick-start the day,” said 5+ A Day general manager Paula Dudley. “We will now work to raise awareness of what people’s options are first thing in the morning by providing more recipe ideas and inspiring consumers through our communication and promotion activities.”

The nationwide survey, involving almost 1,000 participants, was conducted by market research company Consumer Link, with the results used to identify areas for 5+ A Day to focus on over the coming year.

Based on the results, Dudley said awareness of 5+ A Day’s core message was at an all time high, with 92 per cent of participants conscious of the suggested intake of five servings of fresh fruit and vegetables per day.

“The ongoing challenge for our industry is to increase consumption,” Dudley explained.

The survey results indicated price was still perceived to be the biggest barrier to consuming more fresh fruit and vegetables, followed by quality, availability and variety.

“We know that buying fruit and vegetables in season is both cost-effective and nutritious, so 5+ A Day will continue to focus on dispelling the myth that fresh produce is expensive,” Dudley said. “Encouraging people to eat what’s in season will change their perceptions over time and we remain committed to educating and informing the public on this point.

“Another interesting finding is that 53 per cent of consumers do look for health information on packaging or labels such as the vitamin or mineral content. So investment in this area is definitely worth it.”

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